JIM CORBETT NATIONAL PARK

Jim Corbett National Park, named after a famous hunter and British naturalist 'Jim Corbett'* was the first national park in India. The park is spread along the catchments of two rivers- 'Kosi' and 'Ramganga' in the state of 'Uttarakhand' and covers an area over 1200 km2. Located at five hours drive from Delhi, it is the most famous park in India because of its biological diversity and its geographical position at the bottom of the Himalayas. It shelters 350 species of mammals, 2000 species and subspecies of birds, 500 species of amphibians, reptiles and fish, 110 species of trees and 51 species of shrubs.

HISTORY:

The park was created in 1936 with the name Hailey National Park. Sir Malcolm Hailey was then the British governor of the Plain Province. In 1952, five years after the independence of India, it became 'Ramganga National Park', on the name of the river 'Ramganga' which crosses the park along most of its length. In 1957 it was given its new name, Corbett National Park. In 1973 it was selected as a launch pad for the "Project Tiger" aiming at the protection of tigers. Jim Corbett is known for his hunting of man-eater tigers and leopards in the areas of 'Kumaon' and 'Garhwal' in the years 1920, and for the accounts of his adventures in a series of works like the 'man-eaters of Kumaon' and the 'leopards man-eater of Rudraprayag', which became best-sellers worldwide.

During and after the Second World War, the park suffered significantly due to poaching as well as the deforestation. In 1991, the government reinforced the reserve while adding a further 800 km˛ of ground in order to be able to preserve the last Indochinese tigers living in this area. This included the forest division of 'Kalagarh' as well as the 'Sonanadi Wildlife Sanctuary'.

The Corbett national park is one of the 13 reserves protected by World Wildlife Fund. The program of the park aims at protecting the Indochinese tiger, the Asian elephant and the Indian Rhinoceros, by restoring the corridors of the forests to connect the 13 protected areas of Nepal and India and thus to allow the migrations of fauna.

FLORA OF THE PARK:

A total of 488 species different of plants were listed in the park. The reserve has a higher density of the trees of ‘Sal’.

FAUNA OF THE PARK:

More than 585 species of birds resident or migrating were listed, in addition to 33 species of reptiles, 7 species of Amphibians, 7 fish species and 37 species of dragonflies.

The tigers present in the park, are not always easy to locate because of the abundance of camouflage in the reserve. One also finds leopards in the zones of hills, though sometime they can also be seen in lowland jungles. 4 types of deer ('Indian Muntjac', the 'Sambar', the 'Nilgai' and the 'Chital') can be spotted in the reserve. One can also find 'Gharial,' the 'King Cobra,' Wild Boar, the Hedgehog, the Flying Fox and the Indian Pangolin. In summer, the Asian elephant can be seen in herds of up to several hundreds of individuals. The reserve is also home for enormous wild pigs.

Though there is an enormous amount of literature and information about the Reserve available in public domain, a few useful links are given below, should you wish to explore more about 'Jim Corbett National Park' or 'Corbett Tiger Reserve' as it is known today.

CORBETT PARK PAGE IN WIKIPEDIA
CORBETT PARK PAGE IN WIKITRAVEL
PROJECT TIGER PAGE (GOVERNMENT OF INDIA)
INFORMATION ON CORBETT PARK REFERENCE AT MUSEUM OF KNOWLEDGE PAGE
WORLD WILDLIFE ADVENTURE SITE

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